PIKSI Rock Speakers

Linda Martín Alcoff

Linda Martín Alcoff

Hunter College

Linda Martín Alcoff is Professor of Philosophy at Hunter College and the Graduate School, C.U.N.Y. She is also a Professorial Fellow at the Institute for Social Justice at Australian Catholic University in Australia. She is a past President of the American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division. She was named the Distinguished Woman in Philosophy in 2006 by the Society for Women in Philosophy, and one of the 100 most influential Hispanics by Hispanic Business Magazine. Her writings have focused on social identity and race, epistemology and politics, sexual violence, Foucault, Dussel, and Latino issues in philosophy. She has written three books: The Future of Whiteness (Polity Press, 2015); Visible Identities: Race, Gender and the Self (Oxford 2006), which won the Frantz Fanon Award for 2009;Real Knowing: New Versions of the Coherence Theory (Cornell 1996); and co-authored Women’s Choices, Women’s Realities (Oxford 2015). And she has edited ten books including Feminist Epistemologies co-edited with Elizabeth Potter (Routledge, 1993); Thinking From the Underside of History co-edited with Eduardo Mendieta (Rowman & Littlefield, 2000); Identities co-edited with Eduardo Mendieta (Blackwell, 2002); Identity Politics Reconsidered co-edited with Michael Hames-Garcia, Satya Mohanty and Paula Moya (Palgrave, 2006); and Constructing the Nation: A Race and Nationalism Reader co-edited with Mariana Ortega (SUNY 2009). She also writes and speaks regularly for public media, including the New York Times (Philosopher’s Stone series), the New York Indypendent, the Feminist Wire, and has appeared on WNYC and C-Span among others. Besides CUNY she has taught at Brown University, Cornell University, Stony Brook University, University of Aarhus, Florida Atlantic University, and for the past five years she has been teaching for the Decolonial Institute in Spain and South Africa. She is originally from Panama, but lives today happily in Brooklyn. For more info go to www.alcoff.com

Robert Bernasconi

Robert Bernasconi

Penn State University

Robert Bernasconi is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Philosophy and African American Studies at Penn State. He is the editor or co-editor of a number of collections in critical philosophy of race including Race, Miscegenation and Hybridity (Thoemmes, 2005), Race and Racism in Continental Philosophy (Indiana, 2003), Race (Blackwell, 2001), and The Idea of Race (Hackett, 2000). His books include Nature, Culture, Race (S.dert.rn University, 2010) and How to Read Sartre (Norton, 2007). He has also published numerous articles in critical philosophy of race and on Kant, Hegel, Heidegger, Levinas, and Fanon, among others.

Devonya Havis

Devonya Havis

Canisius College

Devonya N. Havis, is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Canisius College in Buffalo, NY. She has taught courses in Ethics, Contemporary Continental Philosophy, Critical Philosophy of Race, and Black Women’s thought at Boston College, Harvard University, and Virginia Union University. Her writings include “Blackness Beyond Witness” in Philosophy and Social Criticism and “Discipline” in the Cambridge Foucault Lexicon.She has a longstanding concern with utilizing philosophy to enhance awareness and promote counter-oppressive practices. Her chapter, “‘Seeing Black’ through Michel Foucault’s Eyes: ‘Stand Your Ground’ Laws as an Anchorage Point for State-Sponsored Racism,” is included in, Pursuing Trayvon Martin: Historical Contexts and Contemporary Manifestations of Racial Dynamics.

José Medina

José Medina

Vanderbilt University

José Medina received his Ph.D. from Northwestern University and is Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. Drawing on American and European critical theorists and philosophers of language, he has published primarily in Social and Political Philosophy (including Social Epistemology), Speech Act Theory, Feminist Theory, Queer Theory and Critical Philosophy of Race. His articles in these areas have appeared in journals such as Critical Philosophy of Race, Inquiry, Metaphilosophy, Philosophical Studies, Philosophy and Social Criticism, and Social Epistemology. His books include Speaking from Elsewhere (SUNY Press, 2006), and The Epistemology of Resistance (Oxford University Press, 2012), which received the 2012 North-American Society for Social Philosophy Book Award. He is currently working on issues concerning epistemic injustice and “epistemic activism” in relation to race, gender, and sexuality.

Eduardo Mendieta

Eduardo Mendieta

Penn State University

Eduardo Mendieta was born in Colombia, but grew up in the United States. He studied at Rutgers, Union Theological Seminary, the New School for Social Research, and the Goethe University in Frankfurt. His research interest include: Frankfurt School Critical Theory, especially the work of Karl-Otto Apel, Jürgen Habermas, Axel Honneth, and Rainer Forst; Latin American philosophy, Liberation Philosophy, and the work of Enrique Dussel –which he has translated–, and Latino/a Philosophy. He has done work on and with Angela Y. Davis, whom he considers to be part of the Critical Theory traditions, given that her philosophical education took place at the Goethe University, and Brown University, under the mentorship of Herbert Marcuse. He has also been doing research on Latin American urbanism. He recently finished a monograph titled The Philosophical Animal: On Zoopoetics and Interspecies Cosmopolitanism, which is forthcoming with SUNY Press, as well as a Spanish edition, with an extended introduction, to work by Angela Y. Davis on penality and prison abolition. He is already at work on what he considers to be a prequel to his animal book, tentatively entitled, Philosophy’s War: Nomos, Polemos, Topos. Most immediately, however, he is editing his essays on the critical philosophy of race and will gather them under the title of Technologies of the Racist Self. He is also editing a couple of anthologies on the history of Latin American philosophy and its most recent developments. Once these books are out, he would like to pursue two other projects. One has to do with Latin American cities, which takes up work on megaurbanization, megaslums, and the Anthropocene he has done over the last couple of years. He has picked some six or seven Latin American cities to exemplify what he call the Latin American “urban genius.” The second project, which is tentatively titled Philosophy’s Workshop, has to do with what he has called philosophy’s paralipomena. The aim is to study, profile, and unearth the many ways in which philosophy is produced, crafted, thought, written, communicated, and confessed: letters, dialogues, voice, diaries/autobiographies, translations, lectures, and the philosopher’s body (female, male, racialized, lesbian, gay, transgender, bisexual, disabled, ugly, etc). The aim is to develop a genealogy of the production of philosophy that is attentive to its material spaces of production. His guiding philosophical idea is that philosophy takes place in and through bodies that are always located in unique institutional spaces, which affect its imaginary. Now that he has moved to Happy Valley, he is interested in taking up his work on prisons, hyper-penality and the revitalization of racism reproduction of race and in the U.S.

He was recently interviewed by Birkbeck Law Review on his work, and Le Monde Diplomatique Colombia.

Sarah Clark Miller

Sarah Clark Miller

Penn State University

Sarah Clark Miller received her PhD in Philosophy from Stony Brook University and her BA in Dance and Philosophy (magna cum laude) from Haverford College. Dr. Miller’s research and teaching interests include theoretical and practical ethics, social and political philosophy, feminist theory, and the history of moral philosophy. She has published on the themes of global ethics, need and obligation, harm and moral injury, Kant’s practical philosophy, biomedical ethics, and Simone de Beauvoir in journals such as Social Theory and Practice and The Journal of Social Philosophy. Her first book, The Ethics of Need: Agency, Dignity, and Obligation, appeared with Routledge Press in 2012. She is currently writing a second book on global responsibility.

Dr. Miller is involved in several of the Rock Ethics Institute’s initiatives, with a current focus on K-12 Moral Literacy and sexual violence. She also is a board member of the Philosophy in an Inclusive Key Summer Institute (PIKSI), a program housed at the Rock Ethics Institute that is designed to encourage undergraduates from underrepresented groups to consider future study in philosophy.

In 2009, Dr. Miller received two national awards: the March of Dimes Young Scholar Award in Perinatal Bioethics from the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities and the March of Dimes, and the Award for Best Paper by a Young Faculty Member from the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics. She was also awarded the Early Career Research Award by the University of Memphis (2009).

Kris Sealey

Kris Sealey

Fairfield University

Kris Sealey is an associate professor of Philosophy, and the director of the Peace and Justice Studies Program at Fairfield University. She graduated from Spelman College in 2001, with a B.Sc. in Mathematics and a minor in Philosophy. She received both her M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy from The University of Memphis, and does research in the areas of Continental Philosophy, Philosophy of Race, and Postcolonial Theory.

Her published articles on Jean-Paul Sartre, Emmanuel Levinas and the philosophy of race can be found in Levinas Studies, Research in Phenomenology, the Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology, as well as Continental Philosophy Review. Her book, Moments of Disruption: Levinas, Sartre and the Question of Transcendence, was published in December 2013 with SUNY Press. Her current book project is on the relationship between creolization and nationalism. Dr. Sealey currently serves as the book review editor of the Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy. She is also a member of the managing board to PIKSI, and of the Secretariat of the CPA (Caribbean Philosophical Association). She has also served as chair of the Committee of Racial and Ethnic Diversity at SPEP (the Society of Phenomenology and Existentialist Philosophy.

Theme

The theme will be announced soon.

Speakers

Guest speakers will engage with you through discussions and seminars.

Schedule

PIKSI Rock will take place from June 21 - June 30, 2017.

Location

Located on Penn State's University Park Campus in State College, PA.

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