PIKSI Rock Speakers

Robert Bernasconi

Robert Bernasconi

Penn State University

Robert Bernasconi is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Philosophy and African American Studies at Penn State. He is the editor or co-editor of a number of collections in critical philosophy of race including Race, Miscegenation and Hybridity (Thoemmes, 2005), Race and Racism in Continental Philosophy (Indiana, 2003), Race (Blackwell, 2001), and The Idea of Race (Hackett, 2000). His books include Nature, Culture, Race (S.dert.rn University, 2010) and How to Read Sartre (Norton, 2007). He has also published numerous articles in critical philosophy of race and on Kant, Hegel, Heidegger, Levinas, and Fanon, among others.

Alfred Frankowski

Alfred Frankowski

Southern Illinois University - Carbondale

 
Alfred Frankowski is assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. He teaches classes and seminars in critical philosophy of race, African American and Africana philosophy, aesthetics, post-colonialism, critical genocide studies, 19th and 20th Century Continental Philosophy and Contemporary Political Philosophy. His published articles focus on memory, cultural, racial, and gender violence and trauma. He is author of The Post-Racial Limits of Memorialization: Toward a Political Sense of Mourning (Lexington Books, 2015)and co-editor of Rethinking Genocide in Africa and the African Diaspora (Rutledge, 2018). He is currently working on two book projects. The first one focuses on the development and implications of de-colonial aesthetics in post-genocide contexts. The second one focuses on the intersections between present forms of anti-black violence, the history of lynching and gender violence, and architecture.  

Nathifa Greene

Nathifa Greene

Gettysburg College

Nathifa Greene is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Gettysburg College. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy from Stony Brook University. Greene teaches courses in theoretical and applied ethics, social and political philosophy, feminist theory, and Latin American and Caribbean philosophy. Her main research areas lie in the critical philosophy of race, social epistemology, the philosophy of action, and philosophies of liberation. Her current project focuses on habit, situating the discussion of social problems in ordinary experiences and in the contours of everyday life, aiming to move philosophical research on habit beyond the simple identification of habit with oppression and instead demonstrate how habits are involved in projects, practices, and forms of knowledge that promote liberation.

Mariana Ortega

Mariana Ortega

Pennsylvania State University

Mariana Ortega is Associate Professor in the Philosophy Department, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexualities at Penn State. Her main areas of research and interest are Women of Color Feminisms, in particular Latina Feminisms, 20th Continental Philosophy, Phenomenology (Heidegger), Philosophy of Race, and Aesthetics. Her research focuses on questions of self and identity, as well as visual representations of race, gender, and sexuality. She has published in various journals including The Journal of Speculative Philosophy, International Philosophical Quarterly, Critical Philosophy of Race, Hypatia, Radical Philosophy Review, and philoSOPHIA. She is co-editor with Linda Martín-Alcoff of the anthology Constructing the Nation: A Race and Nationalism Reader (SUNY, 2009) and author of In-Between: Latina Feminist Phenomenology, Multiplicity, and the Self (SUNY, 2016) in which she presents a theory of multiplicitous selfhood informed by women of color theorizing, in particular Latina feminisms, and Heideggerian phenomenology. Her current research focuses on the intersection of aesthetics, epistemology of ignorance and race. She is the founder and director of the Roundtable on Latina feminism, a forum dedicated to discussions of Latina and Latin American feminisms.

Shay Welch

Shay Welch

Spelman College

Shay Welch is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Spelman College. She holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Binghamton University and was the Gaius Charles Bolin Fellow in Philosophy at Williams College.  Her areas of specialization are Native American Philosophy, Feminist Ethics, and Social/Political Philosophy; she teaches courses on freedom, ethics, sex, and Native philosophy.   

Her first book is A Theory of Freedom: Feminism and the Social Contract.  She and was awarded the Future of Minority Studies Fellowship in publishing for her last book, Existential Eroticism: A Feminist Ethics Approach to Women’s Oppression Perpetuating Choices. And her most recent publications include “Native American Chaos Theory and the Politics of Difference” and “Imagination and Wonder: Native Cognitive Schemas and Democratic Ethics”.  Her upcoming book is Dancing with Native American Epistemology: The Phenomenology of a Performative Knowledge System.  This book will be an analytical but phenomenological articulation of Native American epistemology using a blend of dance theory and cognitive science. She argues that feminism has much to learn from Native philosophy.    

Her professional goals are to support and mentor young women of color in philosophy and to create and lead workshops intended to restructure the canon of political theory to include the voices of white women, women of color, men of color, and the poor.  Such a restructuring would not only make political theory more attuned to concrete political relations and contexts but it will also aid the discipline in recruiting and retaining more underrepresented young philosophers.   

Kyle Whyte

Kyle Whyte

Michigan State University

Kyle Whyte holds the Timnick Chair in the Humanities at Michigan State University. He is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Community Sustainability. His primary research addresses moral and political issues concerning climate policy and Indigenous peoples and the ethics of cooperative relationships between Indigenous peoples and climate science organizations. This research has recently extended to cover issues related to Indigenous food sovereignty. Kyle sees Indigenous philosophies as frameworks for understanding sustainability and resilience and has developed a theory of colonial domination that emphasizes colonialism’s ecological dimensions and their implications for how we understand Indigenous justice. He is an enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. Kyle is involved in a number of projects and organizations that advance Indigenous research methodologies, including the Climate and Traditional Knowledges Workgroup, Sustainable Development Institute of the College of Menominee Nation, Tribal Climate Camp, and Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga New Zealand’s Māori Centre of Research Excellence. He is a former member of the U.S. Federal Advisory Committee on Climate Change and Natural Resource Science. He has recently written on the relationship between Indigenous research methodologies and the field of  philosophy:  https://politicalphilosopher.net/2017/02/03/featured-philosopher-kyle-whyte.

More about his work can be found at http://kylewhyte.cal.msu.edu/.  

Theme

Philosophy and Public Life

Speakers

Guest speakers will engage with you through discussions and seminars.

Schedule

PIKSI Rock will take place from June 27 - July 6, 2018.

Location

Located on Penn State's University Park Campus in State College, PA.

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